General FAQ

It is best if you can give an accurate picture of your health and injuries on your health history form. This enables your therapist to design the most appropriate and effective treatment for you.

There is no requirement to have a referral to see a Registered Massage Therapist. Extended health care plans, and insurers may require a referral before you will be covered. You need to check with your policy to see if you need one to be reimbursed for the treatments.

Rapid NFR Massage FAQ

RAPID sessions may be uncomfortable during the movement phase of the treatment. This occurs as the neurological system is being stimulated to restore normal function.

Everyone is different and at different levels of pain, but most painful conditions are resolved in 2-8 treatments.

Deep Tissue Massage FAQ

Deep tissue massages may cause you a little discomfort or slight pain in the areas that are causing you trouble. Discomfort is normal with this type of massage therapy. Most clients say it’s a “good hurt” where it’s a little uncomfortable but feels good at the same time.

Relaxation massage typically uses Swedish massage techniques, lighter pressure, and is not usually used to treat physical discomforts like muscle knots. The therapist generally follows a full-body sequence and does not focus on any one area of the body for too long.

Deep tissue/therapeutic massage is used to treat physical maladies causing discomfort, such as muscle knots, myo-fascial adhesions, nerve impingements, and much more. The therapist will use different techniques than they would for a relaxation massage and spend treatment time in specific areas instead of following a full-body sequence.

Due to the techniques used, deep tissue/therapeutic massage can sometimes be a bit uncomfortable, but it should not cause a client undue pain or stress.

There can be an increased chance of soreness following a deep tissue/therapeutic massage, but the short recovery period should never be debilitating or leave the client feeling worse than they did before the massage. If you feel extreme discomfort following a massage, it is important to let your therapist know so that they can adjust their technique and/or pressure in future treatments.

Relaxation Massage FAQ

The massage shouldn’t feel painful at any time. Let your therapist know if there are any places you want them to use a different type of pressure on or avoid altogether. Sometimes certain areas can be extra sensitive, but always let your RMT know.

Falling asleep during a massage is very common. Many people go into a massage stressed and sleep-deprived and feel so relaxed that they fall asleep on the massage table. Your therapist won’t judge you if you snore during the massage.
When you wake up, you may notice a little drool on your face or on the massage table. It’s common and has to do with your positioning on the massage table. You don’t have to do anything about it, but you should feel free to ask for a tissue.

Relaxation massage typically uses Swedish massage techniques, lighter pressure, and is not usually used to treat physical discomforts like muscle knots. The therapist generally follows a full-body sequence and does not focus on any one area of the body for too long.

Deep tissue/therapeutic massage is used to treat physical maladies causing discomfort, such as muscle knots, myo-fascial adhesions, nerve impingements, and much more. The therapist will use different techniques than they would for a relaxation massage and spend treatment time in specific areas instead of following a full-body sequence.

Due to the techniques used, deep tissue/therapeutic massage can sometimes be a bit uncomfortable, but it should not cause a client undue pain or stress.

There can be an increased chance of soreness following a deep tissue/therapeutic massage, but the short recovery period should never be debilitating or leave the client feeling worse than they did before the massage. If you feel extreme discomfort following a massage, it is important to let your therapist know so that they can adjust their technique and/or pressure in future treatments.

Myofascial Cupping FAQ

Cupping leaves red, circular marks that can look like bruises (but are not usually painful) These are caused by the increased circulation that the cups draw into the layers of the skin, and they usually last for around one week, sometimes a bit longer.

Hot Stone Massage FAQ

No. Definitely not. Our therapist always holds the stones first before touching them to your body, which ensures that the temperature will not be too hot. However, everyone has their own comfort range. Be sure to speak up if the stones are too hot for you.

Our therapist will begin by applying soothing oil to your back and neck area, which allows the stones to glide smoothly along the muscles. You will lie face down on a specialist bed and our therapist will use the heated stones to massage the back. After the hot stones have relaxed the muscles, our therapist will use her hands to directly massage the skin.

The stones may be applied to rest on the skin once they have cooled to a suitable temperature.

Prenatal Massage FAQ

Since most miscarriages happen during the first 13 weeks of pregnancy, some massage therapists prefer that you wait to see them until after your 13th week, or that you bring a doctor’s note releasing you for massage treatment during the first trimester. Other therapists are willing to see you during the first trimester, particularly if you have a history of healthy pregnancies in the past. At Bounce Right Back we welcome everyone to come at any stage of their pregnancy.

The best position during massage is on your side with pillows for support, which provides the most stability for the baby and is also most comfortable for you.